Connecticut consultant Geoff Luxemberg has been cleared of intimidating election officials while working for a mayoral candidate running in a primary last fall.

Luxemberg, a Democrat who serves in the state House in addition to being co-owner of The Vinci Group, was accused in September of calling the "registrar's office on behalf of two registered voters seeking an emergency application for absentee ballots. Each time, he raised his voice and demanded either registrar fulfill the request immediately."

"He was attempting to intimidate us. He came here and started screaming at us," Republican registrar Dianne Slopak said. "We felt people should be aware of his kind of behavior." 

At the time, Luxemberg was working for Democratic Norwich Mayoral candidate Deb Hinchey, who subsequently won the primary.

On Wednesday he was cleared of violating election law by the State Elections Enforcement Commission. Luxemberg maintained the complaint was politically motivated. 

"I was clear from the beginning of this manufactured controversy that the complaint was not true and that my conduct was solely focused on making sure the registrars of voters in Norwich allowed an elderly woman to exercise her right to vote. I am not surprised with the result and am pleased the record has been set straight," he said in a statement. 

Luxemberg has garnered attention before for his dual role as office holder and consultant. In 2012, he was warned by state House Speaker J. Brendan Sharkey not so solicit business from his colleagues. 

Tags: Election law