In just a few hours, Al Franken will be sworn in as Democrats' 60th senator. His arrival in Washington has been marked by what is an obvious and wise strategy of staidness. Since he arrives already a celebrity, and the winner of a protracted and sometimes heated recount battle, Cillizza recommends that Franken will have to lay low, and maybe even cast a symbolic vote against his party's interests on an issue he believes in, in order to cement a reputation as a strong and serious legislator.

Of course, as Franken heads into office another celebrity is heading out. It's not clear what Sarah Palin will do next, but she's got plenty of offers for speaking and media engagements. Or she could head out east and help out with those marquee gubernatorial campaigns in Virginia and New Jersey—which Michael Steele has suggested but sounds less popular with local pols. As she exits from office later this month, though, her legacy even within Alaska is up in the air, and her sins of upsetting the media and political elites ensure that it will be a battle to reclaim her reputation.

One other politician, though, is neither in or out: South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford has survived his confessional ordeal, as the state GOP has decided to censure his actions but not to ask for his resignation.

Odds & Ends: