Though the GOP has released its budget, this time with numbers, the campaign writers stay centered on New York, where Democrat Scott Murphy's lead slipped to 13 after some ballots were recounted. Before that news was announced, both sides predicted victory using "models" and "raw data" to back their case.

As for why the race is so close, both sides say it's the economy. RNC Chair Michael Steele says that had the race been held in November, Democrats would have won easily. So clearly the country is fed up with "Obamanomics." DCCC Chair Chris Van Hollen says that had the race been held in February, Republican Jim Tedisco would have won easily. So clearly the country is jumping on board Obamanomics. Make up your own mind, I guess.

More special elections are coming later this year, but no one really cares since expected easy Democratic victories leave no room for such back-and-forth.

Politico takes a look at how last year's near tie in Minnesota has fallen into the lap of Gov. Tim Pawlenty, who will likely have to choose who to anger: local Dems and indepedents, or the national GOP whose support he needs for a 2012 presidential bid.

Finally—and it hardly seems at news this point, but I report because his approval is at its lowest yet—Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd continues to trail his potential opponents in polls.